Tag Archives: Washington

June 11, 1942

Thursday PM.

My Dear Ina,

Your letter was received last night. I think the checks have been delivered by now as additional funds were sent to Atlanta when I wired from Orlando. Please deposit it if this is possible, otherwise you may hold it until I return. Mr. Jones will move into our house and I think we should phone Mr. J. A. Allison realtor, to that effect. We will move into their home on Taussig Ave. It is by far the best place I’ve found. In fact I have found practically nothing in Va. and had looked at some for sale, knowing that it was unwise to purchase. Mr. Jones will leave gas stove, refrigerator & I agreed to leave ours at Orlando for them to use also oil circulator. They will leave groceries, sugar etc. & we can do the same thing on an exchange basis. They will leave on next Thursday & will expect to arrive Orlando about Saturday night. I asked them to take some linens & silver and use our beds. We are to use theirs until the move is made. We do not know the successful bidder yet and we do not know which one will load first. Told them we would leave the key with McKelvey across the street.

June 11, 1942

June 11, 1942

B.M. is expected tomorrow (Fri). Emery is here yet and this has been helpful. I see him for a while every day.

I would not advise a chiropodist for W.W. They are like chiropractors. Believe we should get a physician to remove the two nails without destroying the matrix. Will come as soon as I can & we will manage for W.W. when I get there if you want to wait that long. Would like to come this week end but cannot say just yet.

With love
Walter.

On the reverse:

June 9, 1942

Dear Dr. Dove:

Since I wrote you yesterday I have learned that you are now chief of the Division. At the time I wrote that letter I was completely mystified as to your new station, and was guessing that you might be taking Dr. Hawkins’ place.

I’ll feel better to write this letter and make this clear, since my letter could, in view of your new position, easily be interpreted in a way not intended. So just consider that as a personal letter written by me without knowledge or suspicion that you were chief. I believe you know my general attitude well enough anyway to understand this.

The surprise, as you well know, was the most pleasant one I have received since being in the Bureau, and I wish you all the good fortune there is.

Sincerely
[illegible initials – SMS?]

June 3, 1942

Stationery from the Bellevue Hotel, Washington, DC.

Wed. 8 PM.

My dear Sweetheart,

The train was almost two hours late and it took about that much time to get breakfast. Had to wait in line at the diner for more than 30 min. When I reported at Dr. Annand’s office about 11:30 he was in conference, so I did not see him until after lunch.

June 3, 1942

June 3, 1942

On the 6th floor Mr. Stage greeted me as “boss,” and Miss Lynch offered congratulations. My room was spick and span with a bouquet of roses which Miss Lynch brought from her home. During the PM most everyone seemed to have the news, which was announced by Dr. Annand last Saturday morning to the division Chiefs’ meeting.

Cushing looks just fine as a Major and he joined me in a conference with Dr. Annand. This had to do with Army & Bureau services, also use of other entomologists in the Army. Saw Rohner and Hoyt in the hall and they were most cordial. Dr. B. came in at 5:30 and welcomed me to the city. This was in the presence of Claudelle. Claudelle and I ate dinner together and she went to Clarendon on a bus. She had parked her car there. Tomorrow she is going to drive in and I will go out there tomorrow night. She is helping find me a house for us, but has no encouragement so far. She asks if we want to buy a place. I’ll see Cushings, but I understand from C. that Deniza wants $100 per month for her place furnished. They can sell OK if they want to. Annand is building a new home and his may be available. I may inquire about it.

Tomorrow morning I have a session in regard to a chemist. Mr. Jones is to meet me and Dr. Haller at Dr. B’s office at 9 AM. If Jones comes to Orlando he will need a house & we may get him to take ours. If he has a suitable one here, we may be interested in it. I’ll inquire, if this is in line with a move for him. If this develops, you may be moving earlier than you had anticipated. I have not had time enough to determine if it will be necessary to make a trip soon. I’ll need several days to get oriented here.

Under the present conditions I think you will like Wash. C has a secret. Please keep to yourself (next Dec.) She looks fine & has a little tan. She is over joyed at our moving here. B.M. is in Gulfport for about a week.

With love
Walter.

P.S. I am writing Mr. Knipling.

May 30, 1942

Telegram.

W E DOVE=
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY & PLANT QUARANTINE 415 NORTH

PARRAMORE ST ORLANDO FLO (RX)=
CUSHING LEFT FOR ARMY SERVICE THURSDAY. PROCEED TO WASHINGTON YOUR EARLY CONVENIENCE IN LINE WITH MY CONVERSATION WITH YOU IN ORLANDO. STAGE HANDLING THINGS SATISFACTORILY NOW BUT YOU MAY WISH TO COME HERE BEFORE FINALLY TRANSFERRING YOUR HOUSE HOLD GOODS AND FAMILY. WIRE YOUR PLANS=

P N ANNAND.

May 30, 1942

May 30, 1942

The stint in Orlando didn’t last long. Walter has now been promoted to direct the entire USDA Division of Insects Affecting Animals and Man. The Orlando lab is part of that Division, but Walter, Ina, and their boys will now have to move to Washington, DC so Walter can oversee the war-oriented insecticide programs at a higher level.

January 7, 1942

Walter and Ina were together in December 1941, so we don’t have any insight on their immediate thoughts about the US entry into WWII. However, Walter’s work is about to change directions because of that. The USDA is now consolidating various research and control teams, and will soon reassign Walter to direct a project that will define both his career and the future trajectory of entomology.

Tuesday Night

May get away in a day or two but I am not having all of the luck that was anticipated. We think that time will bring consolidation but objections are not easy to overcome.

Walter.

January 7, 1942

January 7, 1942

August 30, 1936

Stationery from the Bellevue Hotel, 15 E St. NW, Washington, D.C.

Sunday Night 9 PM.

My dear Ina & Sons,

The trip was a quiet one and comfortable with no special happenings. The Pullmans on both the SP and the Southern were air conditioned and rather cool. At stations where I could get outside I felt more comfortable from the warmer air. Spent a good lot of the time on the paper and hope I can get it copied tomorrow. Met two young boys about 23 who were completing a trip around the U.S. They left at a North Carolina point this morning, having been with me from San Antonio. They go back to college in N.C. soon.

August 30, 1936

August 30, 1936

Received some material from Mr. Townsend and Mr. Yeomans sent by air mail and I think I have everything for the conference tomorrow. Most anything can happen but if it concerns the winter program I think I am fortified.

This is a nice little hotel. New and comfortable and I am glad that I discovered it. It is about five blocks from the station. You will remember several hotels in a group near the station and this is one of them. Room and bath for $2.00 so it looks like I can eat out of the per diem. It cost exactly $5 per day to eat on the train plus tips. I made a reservation for Atlanta leaving here tomorrow night at 7 PM but I have no idea when I’ll get through. Just in case I need it, I’ll have it. The last time I had to take an upper and I did not sleep. The train is too fast for an upper berth. One rolls too much.

Wish I could tell you something but so far nothing has happened. If you went to Uvalde I hope you enjoyed the trip and that the traffic did not give you trouble. Hope you found Mother Lewis and all OK.

With love to the Big boys, Claudelle, and lots and lots to my wife.

Your
Walter.

January 15, 1932

Jan 15, 1932
Friday Night.

My dear Sweetheart,

Yesterday and today I have been visiting. I visited with Dr. White yesterday morning and last night he and I ate at the Allies. Spent yesterday PM and this AM & PM with Bish and the people we called on. We called on Dr. Marlatt and I had a chance to tell him of our work at Chas. He had been reading my reports. His questions showed it. Says he is going to drive south this spring and promised to stop at Chas a while. He asked about the gardens.

January 15, 1932

January 15, 1932

Did not get a promise of a truck sprayer but they are trying to locate one for me. Bish and I called on the Plant Quarantine Administration regarding it. Think I’ll see Rohiver tomorrow morning. I think he can be of more help to me than anyone else. Bish visits but does not say yes or no. He is afraid to tell anyone anything for sure, except that we can’t do anything. I am mighty glad that I am not located up here. There seems to be no chance of getting Gilbert in up here and so far I have had no encouragement for another appointment for Frank. I am afraid that we cannot keep him after March 4th. I am trying to get the truck sprayer and this should be a strong argument for Frank’s reappointment.

I hope that everything is going well with you and Buddy. If it is as warm there as it is here, you do not need to have a furnace fire. I’ll have to be here Monday and possibly longer. You can bet that I’ll come home as soon as I feel that I have accomplished all that I can here.

Everyone asks of you and Buddy. Saw Dr. Roark this AM. Will try to call while I am here & see Mrs. Roark.

I love you Honey.

Your
Walter

January 14, 1932

Stationery from the Hotel Houston, 910 E Street NW, Washington, DC; “All rooms with shower bath – A room and a bath for two and a half.”

My dear Sweetheart,

Had a good rest and arrived on time, about 6:40 A.M. The train was not crowded but the Washington car was filled. I had a berth in a NY City car and this one did not stay here. Had to get up a little earlier than I would have in a Wash. car.

January 14, 1932

January 14, 1932

It is very foggy here this A.M. It was difficult to see the buildings from a street car on Penn. Ave. Had breakfast on the Ave. & then came here. This is the hotel Mr. Reid suggested. It has a Charleston atmosphere, dirty bath room and dim lights. But it doesn’t cost $4.00 like the Harrington, only $2.50. The shower bath looks like it might work.

I hope you had a good rest and that Buddy is not too much trouble. Honey, I don’t like for you to lift him. I believe the little step ladder stool in the kitchen, would be about right for his bed. I think it would be a good idea to try and let him climb into his bed. Also when he gets up, let him use it to climb down.

I’ll try to get through here as soon as possible. I have no idea just when this will be. I may get home Sunday A.M. but don’t be disappointed if I don’t get back that soon.

I love you Honey, and you too Buddy.

Your
Walter.

June 10, 1931

Wednesday Night.

My dear Sweetheart,

The meetings go along OK. It has been cool & raining. The exhibit awards were made this PM. Dr. Shelmire and I were given second place in Class I. He is out tonight. I have just returned from Dr. White’s h√łtel. Have had two whole evening visits with him. He has a nice exhibit up here and would have drawn a prize if he had been demonstrating something as new as ours. He is feeling pretty good, and talks about as usual.

June 7, 1931

June 7, 1931

Our paper is scheduled for Friday morning sometime. The exhibits close at either 12 M or 2 PM. Expect to go to Wash. Friday night and spend the day there. They close at noon so I won’t be able to see very many [museums?]. Hope to arrive home Sunday A.M.

With love,

Walter.

June 10, 1931: AMA Award

June 10, 1931: AMA Award

The two researchers published their work the following Spring. The paper is a footnote in medical history, as fleas turned out to be the primary vectors of endemic typhus.

November 1, 1926

Letter of Authorization
No. 516
Washington, D.C.
November 1, 1926

Mr. W. E. Dove, Collaborator.

Under authority conferred upon me by paragraph 2 of the Fiscal Regulations of the Department, you are hereby authorized to incur expenses as follows, during the fiscal year 1927, in the performance of official duties, under the appropriation: “General expenses, Bureau of Entomology, 1927, Miscellaneous Insects” –

November 1, 1926

November 1, 1926

To make such trips from Baltimore, Md., to Washington, D.C., and return, as may be necessary, for the purpose of conferring with Dr. G. F. White, Insect Pathologist of this Bureau, with reference to investigations of insects affecting the health of animals in which you are both engaged.

To incur necessary traveling expenses.

You will be reimbursed for actual subsistence expenses, not to exceed $7.00 in any one day, while absent from official station and in a travel status.

L.O. Howard
Chief of Bureau

Your official station will be Baltimore, Md.

A second page indicates that the total year’s travel budget for this project is $50, which would be $643.12 in today’s money.